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Fourth Annual Physician Liaison Summit East

World Congress Summits offer a unique opportunity to meet with a smaller, more focused group of people and make meaningful connections. The nature of the discussions is often more open and interactive than what usually happens at larger conferences.

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Building on Established Physician Referral Patterns

How established are physicians’ referral patterns? How can we support physicians in strengthening and extending their referral networks?

Through in-depth interviews with physicians, we’ve collected insight and identified opportunities to build on established physician referral patterns. Here’s what we found.

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Top 5 Strategies for Strengthening Referrals We Heard at HMPS15

Referral leakage and network development were on attendees’ minds at the Healthcare Marketing and Physician Strategies Summit in Las Vegas, Nevada this year more than ever before.

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Understanding the Challenge in Physician Colleague Awareness

Doctors tend to refer to doctors they know. The challenge is that doctors today know their colleagues less. Why?

Over the past 6 months, we’ve spoken with physicians, nurses, practice staff members, physician liaisons and other administrators to better understand the challenges associated with physicians getting to know each other better. Here’s what we found.

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Art in Medicine:
The History of Vesalius

The hallmark of a good scientist? Curiosity…and maybe an eye for artistic form. In an age in which everything seems to have been discovered, it’s interesting to look back on how our earliest physicians and researchers conceived of the human body and advanced medical knowledge.

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Greystone HCIC 2014

The Greystone HCIC conference was last week, and we had a great time learning from wonderful talks and speaking with interesting people. We were also happy for the opportunity to give a talk with Swedish Covenant Hospital’s Senior Director of Marketing, Karen Malsom.

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A New Rivalry in Digital Health

Last week, yet another company announced a health platform–Microsoft’s aptly named “Microsoft Health.” Their platform is designed to unite fitness devices and health services under a community cloud that also gives participants crowdsourced insights into ways to live healthier. The corresponding fitness wearable is called the Microsoft Band, and it aims to help people enhance their productivity as well as their exercise routine.

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Happy Birthday, Dr. Jonas Salk!

Did you see him in the Google doodle yesterday? Jonas Salk, the developer of the polio vaccine, was born 100 years ago yesterday, on October 28th, 1914. We remember Dr. Salk this week, World Polio Week, with gratitude. His passion and dedication to public health changed the course of modern medicine and vastly improved life for generations to come.

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A Great Experience at SHSMD

Last week, Jessie, Moses and Oksana attended the American Hospital Association’s Society for Healthcare Strategy and Market Development (SHSMD) Connections 2014 conference in San Diego. The conference is a valuable yearly gathering of innovators from healthcare provider, agency and vendor organizations.

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Can Walgreens Drive Digital Health Adoption?

Recently, the fitness-tracking company Misfit Wearables announced a partnership with Walgreens’ Balance Rewards Points program. Another household name, WebMD, also recently partnered with Walgreens. These three companies combined–fitness tracking, retail, and online health content—have the potential to offer a great collaboration in digital health services.

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Designing for Exciting Problems

This past weekend, our head of design, Jessie Gatto, participated on a panel at MIT’s Hacking Arts conference, which seeks to inspire new advances in the creative industries. Jessie spoke on a panel on Democratizing Design.

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The Importance of Health Literacy

Today, October 1st, marks the beginning of Health Literacy Month. Put simply, health literacy is the ability to understand and act on the health information that one reads or hears.

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MATTER: Uniting Chicago's Healthcare Communities

If you’re hip in Chicago, you’ve probably heard of 1871, the entrepreneurial space for digital startups. What you might not be aware of is MATTER, an emerging incubator built solely for healthcare startups.

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Apple iOS 8: A Consumer Health Revolution?

Today, Apple launches iOS 8, its new operating system that introduces a host of new apps and capabilities. Not least of these is the simply named “Health” platform, which, on the iPhone or hotly anticipated “Apple Watch,” provides a dashboard of all of the user’s health and fitness data.

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Hippocrates and Ancient Greek Medicine

“I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug.”

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Researching Doctors: An Interview with Dominic Carone

Have you ever wondered how to research a doctor’s qualifications and bedside manner before making an appointment? We interviewed Dominic Carone, a board certified neuropsychologist at SUNY Upstate Medical University and the founder of MedFriendly.com, for suggestions.

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The Era of Wearables

When you think of digital health, what comes to mind? For many, the answer is “wearables”–trackers and sensors that help us monitor our activity level, caloric intake, and even the quality of our sleep. This is all part of the “quantified self movement,” a growing consumer interest in understanding and learning from data about our health.

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How To Find a Gynecologist

Even if you have a primary care provider, it’s important for women to schedule regular visits with a gynecologist in order to stay healthy. In fact, many young women use gynecologists as their primary care providers. In this “How To” post, we’ll offer some tips on how to find a good gynecologist.

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Thank You for Not Smoking:
Remembering Dr. Jesse Steinfeld

In 1969, Dr. Jesse Steinfeld walked into his new office, removed the many ashtrays he saw around him, and replaced them with signs: Thank you for not smoking. Dr. Steinfeld had just been elected Surgeon General of the United States, and he was determined to change the public perception of smoking.

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Healthcare and the Power of Stories

What is narrative medicine? Although it has been a master’s program at Columbia University since 2000, it’s still a relatively new field. Technically, “narrative medicine” is simply a medical approach that recognizes the value of narrative (in other words, stories and human experience) in clinical practice, research, and education.

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Happy Anniversary, Medicare

49 years ago today, on July 30, 1965, Medicare was signed into law under President Lyndon Johnson. After years of advocacy under both President Truman and President Kennedy, it was a hard-won victory. Created to provide health insurance to everyone over the age of 65, Medicare represents a significant historical moment not just in healthcare, but in American culture.

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Exciting Developments In Digital Health

The phrase “digital health” is fairly broad. It encompasses any service or product that uses digital technology to make healthcare and medicine more accessible, more efficient, more affordable, more precise, more personal, and of higher quality.

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How to Find the Right Prenatal Care for You

When you’re searching for a healthcare provider to help you navigate pregnancy and delivery, you might find that the world of prenatal health care can be complex. In this “How To” post, we’ll discuss the different types of healthcare providers that can guide you through your pregnancy and delivery.

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Helping Her Live:
Building Healthier Communities

HHL navigators use outreach and education to navigate women to breast-related health services, namely mammograms screenings and follow-up care. They focus on the southwest and west sides of Chicago, notably North Lawndale and Humboldt Park, working with women at community events, health fairs, churches, job fairs, food pantries, domestic violence shelters, and anywhere else that women might be in need of breast cancer screenings.

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A Healthier, Smarter Chicago:
An Interview with Daniel X O'Neil

How can we improve public health in Chicago? For Daniel X O’Neil, the answer is: through data. O’Neil is the executive director of SmartChicago, a civic organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people in Chicago through technology.

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Remembering Dr. Arnold Relman

Last week marked both the birthday and the death, at 91, of an important and outspoken figure in medicine: Dr. Arnold Relman. Dr. Relman led the New England Journal of Medicine as editor for 23 years, and wrote extensively about healthcare reform. This week, we’d like to take a moment to remember his accomplishments and his lasting legacy.

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Health & Community on the Same Page: An Interview with Purple Binder founder Joseph Flesh

Joseph Flesh was a software engineer running a consultancy when he was hired by a nonprofit client who asked him to build a database of local social services. At first, Joseph was surprised by the assignment. Isn’t that kind of database already online? But as he began to research the project, he discovered that social services and community resources like shelters and food pantries were often difficult, if not impossible, to find online.

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An Interview with a Breast Cancer Screening Navigator

A few weeks ago, we spoke with navigators at the Puerto Rican Cultural Center who help community members learn about the Affordable Care Act. This week, we spoke with a different kind of navigator: a breast cancer screening navigator at John Stroger Hospital. Trained by the American Cancer Society, Charna Albert serves as a liaison between patients, doctors, and administrators to help patients find appropriate breast cancer screenings. We discussed her work, its challenges, and its rewards.

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We're working with the Neighborhood Parents Network!

A few weeks ago, we were featured in Built In Chicago’s “Hot Startups Across Chicago” feature. We were excited to be included in a list of such great companies, and also excited to finally speak up about our newest venture–a partnership with the Neighborhood Parents Network.

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From Boomers to Millennials:
Marketing Care to Different Generations

What are the two largest generations today? Millennials and baby boomers, at 86 million and 77 million, respectively. Because of their important expectations and needs as healthcare consumers, these two generations are discussed frequently in healthcare marketing.

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Health, Mind and Memory:
An interview with author David MacLean

“I sometimes make the glib joke that the worst thing that can happen to a writer is a diagnosis. It narrows your vision.”


This is the writer David MacLean, who recently published the memoir The Answer to the Riddle is Me.

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A Great Legacy:
Florence Nightingale

Today, on Florence Nightingale’s birthday, it’s worth looking back on her many accomplishments to learn not only from her kindness, but also from her business acumen and her innovative spirit.

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A Day in the Life:
Healthcare Navigators at the Puerto Rican Cultural Center

It’s a platitude, but a true one: when you love what you do, it shows in your work. When we spoke with Raul Maldonado and Leslie Rodriguez to learn about their work as healthcare navigators, their passion for their job was unmistakable. They believe that affordable healthcare is an individual right and a social necessity, and they’re doing everything in their power to make it a reality.

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Day in the Life of a Resident:
Will Boysen

We’re beginning a new blog series: talking to resident physicians to find out what they love about their work and glimpse a day in their busy lives. Today, we talk to William Boysen at the University of Chicago.

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Workplace Wellness as Innovation

It’s not news that Google has broken into the digital health space; it seems like every tech company is jumping at the chance to innovate healthcare and day-to-day wellness. What’s especially interesting is that tech giants like Google are also creating extensive workplace programs designed to prioritize the health and wellness of their employees. What does this trend look like, and what does it mean for wider corporate culture?

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Walk-in clinics:
The next big thing?

The Affordable Care Act is making a lot of headlines this month. From reaching its milestone of 7 million signups to the official resignation of Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius this past Friday, developments under the new healthcare law have been nothing if not exciting.

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How to Find a Pediatrician

Whether you’re looking for your baby’s first pediatrician, scrambling to replace a retiring pediatrician, or moving to a new city, finding a good provider for your child can be especially stressful.

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Health Through Community in
Chicago's Hispanic Neighborhoods

At Chicago’s Lower West Clinic in Pilsen, a branch of Mercy Hospital, undocumented Hispanic immigrants can walk in without an appointment and receive care in their own community, in their own language, for only $15.

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Return of the House Call?

Today, when we talk about the doctor-patient relationship, there’s rarely mention of a concept that was once emblematic of the doctor-patient relationship: the house call.

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An iPad a Day: Kids and Touch Screens

If the blog “Babies With iPads” teaches us anything, it’s that kids are being exposed to technology at ever-younger ages. There are educational iPad apps for toddlers, TV shows to help make your baby a genius, and debates over the age at which it’s acceptable for a child to have her own iPhone.

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A Culture of Self-Reliance: Ukrainian Health

Did you know that 46,000 Ukrainian Americans live in Chicago? For our “Health Across Cultures” blog series, we talked to Dr. Dmytriv at Midwest Health Center about her experience with healthcare in Ukrainian culture, and why cultural competence is so important.

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Call the American Midwife?

In 1957, Jenny, at the tender age of 22, leaves her well-off family for the first time to become a midwife in the slums of London’s East End. The area is ravaged by the war, and families live in destitute poverty. Jenny is surprised to find that the midwifery group she will be working with is a group of nuns living in a convent—not a hospital.

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Saint Valentine...
Before Valentine's Day

In 1988, a very strange Italian stamp was released. It depicts a man dressed in robes with a crown and staff, standing over a couple lying on the ground. Above them hover red and yellow squiggles—a representation of brain waves as seen on an EEG.

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Happy Birthday, Dr. Blackwell

It is not easy to be a pioneer – but oh, it is fascinating! I would not trade one moment, even the worst moment, for all the riches in the world. – Elizabeth Blackwell

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Take Two Dried Centipedes: Natural Medicine in Chinatown

In this blog series, we’ll be taking trips across Chicago and interviewing doctors and patients to investigate how culture affects health. Cultural differences (or similarities) between doctors and patients affect not only communication, but also diagnosis, treatment, and general understanding of patient wellness.

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An Interview with Dr. Martin Luther King's Doctor

At age 90, Dr. Quentin Young remembers one patient he had in 1965 particularly well.

“I have a cherished picture of him taken when he was at a march on the South Side. I went to several marches with him when he was here in Chicago. And he did visit me as my patient, but he didn’t get sick very much. He was a very healthy person.”

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Viral Dialogue

“Sharing.” The concept is integral to both social media and real-life human relationships. After all, we’re always looking for ways to connect with and nurture the people we care about. Health is inherently social, and social media channels present incredible opportunities for social sharing.

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Exploring Healthcare.gov
with Usability Experts

Every website has usability problems. In fact, we’re pretty sure ours does, too. Creating a great user experience for anyone who lands on your website isn’t easy, but it’s incredibly important.

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Talking to Healthcare Providers

A while ago on our blog, we discussed how to ask your friends for doctor recommendations. So maybe they’ve given you the names of some good doctors, or maybe your friends weren’t much help. What’s the next step?

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Haleh Rabizdeh Resnick, Mom and Author of "Little Patient Big Doctor"

Choosing a doctor can be tricky. Lucky for me, my mom is Dr. Mom. Isn’t yours? Fever? Chicken soup. Twisted ankle? Tumeric and egg yolk. Acid reflux? Cut the sugar, add some lemon. Headache? Stop working so much. But when I finally have to cave and Dr. Mom is not enough, here are some tips to finding a doctor who works for you.

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How to Ask People You Trust

Once you know your priorities, how do you find a great doctor who matches your preferences? Think about who has preferences that match yours. Most likely, you’re thinking of your friends, your family, or your community. This week we look at effective ways to reach out to them.

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Interview with Moses Hohman,
Founder and CEO of Human Practice

This week we interview Moses to learn more about the talk he’s giving next week about how doctors want to build their practice at the American Hospital Association’s Society for Healthcare Strategy & Market Development’s conference.

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Know Your Priorities

For our first “How To” blog post on finding a doctor, we’ll start with the basics: priorities. A crucial step in deciding on a physician is knowing your preferences and comfort levels when it comes to health care.

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Where Do You Start?

The time has come. You need to find a doctor. You aren’t satisfied with picking a pediatrician at random from your insurance website, or with choosing an ob-gyn based on a quick Google search. Whether you already have a stack of options or are going into the search cold, finding a doctor who fits with your needs and preferences is no small task.

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Guest Blog: Carrie McAteer,
Danny Did Foundation

We are honored this month to have Carrie McAteer from the Danny Did Foundation share her doctor search story.

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Human Practice

We have interviewed hundreds of patients about how they find and recommend their doctors. Consistently we’ve found that the process of finding a doctor, for most of us, is far too random. Certainly this is true on the Internet. We search–using our insurance websites, Google, ratings sites, etc.–and most often find very little information.

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